Chip Harris

Chip Harris is a registered nurse from Greensboro, N.C.  He has been cycling seriously since 2012.  Having completed several challenging rides over the past three years, Chip enjoys pushing himself and the sense of accomplishment that comes with completing these adventures.  He is honored to ride for Hospice in the Race Across America.  He hopes to raise both awareness and funding for Hospice, as well as, honor his mother who died of lung cancer when he was 24 years old.

Charles Fields

Charles began to take up cycling as a way to rehabilitate his right knee after an operation to repair a worsening chronic injury.  He started out with a cheap heavy hybrid bike riding around the neighborhood but found that going faster and further was not only rewarding from a physical fitness but also a mental fitness standpoint.  He has moved from a quick neighborhood jaunts to completing numerous century, double century and triathlon relay events.  His recent events included Blood Sweat and Gears and the Mountains of Misery centered on the mountainous areas of Virginia and North Carolina’s Eastern Continental Divide.

Charles lives in Greensboro, NC with his wife and “elite sherpa” Lisa.  They have a son, Jackson, who currently plays lacrosse at Transylvania University and an 8 year old Chesapeake Bay Retriever, Deacon.  Charles works as a vascular surgeon with Cone Health.  In addition to cycling, Charles enjoys playing chef at home, grilling and cooking gourmet meals and acting as amateur sommelier.

Charles’ Tri for Hospice Story

Most patients requiring arterial reconstructive surgery are older and have multiple medical problems.  Fifty percent of patients with peripheral arterial disease die within 5 years of their diagnosis so I frequently deal with end of life issues.  Hospice has been an outstanding resource to help my patients and their families deal with death in a manner that provides comfort and dignity.   It has been said that rule number one for physicians is that all patients eventually die.  Rule number two is that physicians can’t change rule number one.  Hospice helps patients and families bridge where medicine ends and humanity, dignity, and comfort come to center stage.

All patients deserve dignity and comfort as they approach death.  By raising funds for Greensboro Hospice and Palliative care we provide that resource for patients and families that would otherwise go without.
 

Becky Sage (2016)

Becky Sage is 38 years old and has been a Triad resident for the majority of her life.  She is a former college athlete in volleyball and softball and has taught high school science at both Southern Guilford and Ledford High Schools.  She has been married to her husband, Randall, for 11 years and now stays at home with her two children, Addison (age 9) and Trip (age 8).

Becky began her triathlon career in 2009, and like most new triathletes, she figured out quickly how addictive the sport can be.  In 2012, she finished her first Olympic distance race.  Working with Coach Karen Buxton (www.coachbuxton.com), in 2011 Becky completed four Half Ironman distance triathlons, placing in the top 3 in her age group in two and qualifying for the USA Triathlon HalfMax Championships, as well as the 2012 World Championships.  As one of the original Team Tri for Hospice members, Becky completed her first full distance triathlon at the US Ironman Championship in New York City in August, 2012.  Since then, she has successfully finished Ironman Mont Tremblant (2014), Ironman Lake Placid (2015) and Ironman Chattanooga (2015).  Becky was also selected as a Silver-level All World Ironman athlete in 2015. 

Becky’s “Why Tri for Hospice” Story

My “Why Tri for Hospice” story takes on a very special meaning this year with the recent passing of my father, Robert “Bob” Hypes in 2015, after a courageous battle with bladder cancer.  Prior to his illness, my only exposure to hospice care had been with the passing of my mother-in-law, Judith “Sylvia” Sage in 2011.  With both of my loved ones, there came a time when everyone knew we needed to change the focus from finding a cure to finding comfort in their final days.  During those times of so many questions, fears, and uncertainties, the caring people from Hospice were able to provide support and comfort to not only my loved ones, but to our entire family.  Hospice was instrumental in allowing the final wishes of my dad and mother-in-law to be carried out to the end with grace and dignity. 

With Team Tri for Hospice, I have the opportunity to continue to raise both awareness and financial support for an organization that helped my family provide care, comfort, and compassion to my dad, Bob, and my mother-in-law, Sylvia.  There is no doubt that this year I will be racing with a heavier heart and missing my father, but I am honored to have the opportunity to participate in RAAM 2016 in his memory.  Hopefully with the funds raised by Team Tri for Hospice, other families can receive the same “caring to the finish” as my loved ones. 

This one’s for you dad….

 

Becky Sage (2012)

Becky Sage is 34 years old and has been a Triad resident for the majority of her life.  She is a former college athlete in volleyball and softball and returned to her high school (Southern Guilford) to coach and teach Biology after graduation.  She has been married to her husband, Randall, for seven years and now stays at home with her two children, Addison (age 5) and Trip (age 3 ). 

Becky began her triathlon career in 2009, and like most new triathletes, she figured out quickly how addictive the sport can be.   In 2010, she finished her first Olympic distance race.  Working with Coach Karen Buxton, in 2011, Becky completed four Half Iron Distance triathlons, placing in the top 3 in her age group in two, and qualifying for the USA Triathlon HalfMax Championships, as well as the 2012 World Championships.  The Ironman US Championship in New York City will be her first attempt at completing an Iron Distance race. 

Becky’s “Why Tri for Hospice” Story

My “Why Tri for Hospice” story begins with my mother-in-law, Judith “Sylvia” Sage.  She was diagnosed with multiple myeloma, a rare blood cancer, in 2006.  During her long and courageous battle, there came a time when both she and our family knew that the focus had to turn from finding a cure, to making her comfortable in her final weeks.  During a time of so many questions, fears, and uncertainties, the caring people from Hospice were able to provide support and comfort to not only Judith, but to our entire family.   Hospice was the instrumental part that allowed my mother-in-law’s final wishes to be carried out to the end with grace and dignity.  She passed away peacefully in her home in June of 2011.

In one of the very last conversations I had with Judith, she told me how proud she was of what I was accomplishing in my short racing career.  I will be competing in the US Ironman Championships in New York City, her home town, in her memory.  Through Tri for Hospice, I will be able to raise both awareness and financial support for an organization that helped our family provide care, comfort, and compassion to my mother-in-law.  Hopefully, with the funds we raise, other Triad families can receive the same “caring to the finish.”

 

Dina Arceo

Dina started running with friends as a hobby which quickly turned into a passion that led to racing in 10 full marathons in just a few years.  Dina has qualified for the Boston Marathon eight times and ran in Boston in 2010.  She will also be running in the Boston Marathon in 2012.

Dina’s discovery of triathlons began as a desire to cross train to spare her joints.  She soon began to love training in swimming and cycling as much as running and started to compete in races.  In just a short span of three years, Dina has raced in multiple events at all distances, including completing her first full Ironman in Louisville, KY last summer.  She has also completed four half Ironman distance races.

Dina received a B.A. from the University of North Carolina, Wilmington and an M.D. from West Virgina University.  Dina practices medicine with Greensboro Radiology in Greensboro, N.C. and specializes in Mammography.  Dina (44) lives with her husband Glenn Yamagata, son Daniel (12) and daughter Lily (10).  In her free time she enjoys traveling, skiing and reading.

Dina’s “Why Tri for Hospice” Story

I will be participating this year in the Ironman U.S. Championship in New York City on August 11, 2012.  This will be my second Ironman race.  This event will be special for me since I will be racing for a cause close to my heart.

My mother Elizabeth was a loving mother, wife and pediatrician who lost a two year battle with leukemia on January 27, 2012 after a courageous fight. The care given to my mother by hospice allowed her to die with dignity at home, for which my family and I will be forever grateful.

I have teamed with three fellow triathletes and friends Karen Buxton, Phil Beane and Becky Sage to form Tri for Hospice.  This year our team will be racing in the New York Ironman to raise money for Hospice and Palliative Care of Greensboro.

Having raised sponsorship money to pay for expenses, we are still seeking donations that will go completely to Hospice and Palliative Care.  All four of us have had cancer touch our lives and have experienced first hand the devastation and pain this terrible disease can have on families.  The care that hospice provides in both hospital and home settings is crucial in allowing cancer patients and others with chronic diseases to suffer as little as possible at the end of their lives.

Donations to hospice go towards providing compassionate care to patients who sometimes do not have the means or insurance to pay.  Your donation will make a real difference in the lives of patients with end-stage diseases and their families.  Thank you for considering supporting our cause.  By racing this summer and in the future, we hope to raise awareness about cancer, hospice and compassionate medical care.  Your support will go a long way towards accomplishing our goal of “caring to the finish”.

Phil Beane

Phil competed in his first 5k while in the Army and instantly feel in love with the “challenge and competition” of racing. He continued to run in various road races over the years and was often asked to join triathlon relay teams to run. Competing in just one piece of the race wasn’t enough to satisfy his competitive spirit so he began to add swimming and biking to his training program. Phil completed his first Sprint triathlon in 2003.
Since his first race, Phil has competed in many Sprint, International and Half-Ironman distance races – many of which he has placed in his age group and overall. He completed his first Ironman distance race in May, 2011 in the Woodlands, Texas. Phil has also continued to run, having competed in several half marathons and his first full marathon in December, 2010. He is looking forward to a personal best in this year’s US Championship Ironman in NY on August 11th.

Phil is a NC native and served in the US Army with the 82nd Airborne Division. He graduated from UNCG with a BS in Information Systems and is employed with Apex Analytix as a Senior Director – Corporate Data and Delivery. He is also a General Contractor and co-owner of New Horizon Construction and Remodeling. Phil (37) resides in Greensboro with his Ironman support crew, wife Jen and 2 children, Kyndall (8) and Cohen (6). In his spare time, Phil enjoys spending time with his family, coaching his son’s football and baseball teams, racing his daughter in the pool, watching UNC sports, and traveling.

Phil’s “Why Tri for Hospice” Story

Over the past several years, I have seen many close friends and family members affected by cancer and other terminal illnesses. I have watched these friends and family cope with the devastating news and how the decisions regarding the care for their loved one have been the most difficult ones to make. The one constant in all these situations has been the care and support of Hospice.

I was able to witness first-hand the depths of this amazing agency’s compassion when my wife’s grandmother was in their care during her long and courageous fight against cancer. The nurses and staff at the center were remarkable care givers, providing constant love and support. Hospice guided her and the family through the difficult journey with dignity and the family was so touched by the outpouring of love that my father in law became a volunteer.

With the help of my teammates, our hope is to provide this same opportunity for every individual and every family when it comes time to make those difficult, end of life decisions. ‘Caring to the finish’ is our goal for Hospice because we know that caring for a lifetime is yours.

 

Karen Buxton (2012)

Karen Buxton has been a professional coach for over 25 years and has specialized in working with endurance athletes for the past ten. Karen, who has a B.S. in Allied Health Sciences from Johnson State College and a M.Ed. in Athletic Administration from Temple University, holds coaching certifications of Level-III from USA Triathlon and Expert-Level from USA Cycling. She also has served as the Secretary-General of USA Triathlon's Board of Directors, Co-Chair for USAT’s Age Group Commission, a board member of USAT's Mid-Atlantic Region and as a member of USAT’s Duathlon Commission.

Taking up triathlon 20 years ago, Karen has worked her way from a mid-packer in sprintdistance races to representing the United States on ten world teams (four in triathlon and six in duathlon). Highlights of her long racing career include: a member of a four-woman team that finished the 2002 Race Across America (RAAM), nine ironman-distance races including the 2005 Hawaii Ironman World Championship, a 5th place overall finish in the 2000 U.S. Long Course Championships, 1st place age group finish at the 2007 Long Course Duathlon Championships, an age group silver medal at the 2007 Long Course World Duathlon Championships, and a second place finish in her age group a the 2010 USAT Sprint Triathlon National Championships. Buxton has been a two-time USA Triathlon All-American (2001 & 2003) and has been inducted into her high school and college Athletic Hall of Fame.

Karen lives in Greensboro, NC, and coaches triathletes, duathletes, cyclists and runners from first-timers to elites.

Karen’s “Why Tri for Hospice” Story

This August 11th I will participate in my 10th Ironman race in NYC, and I will be competing in memory of my brother, Jeff, who passed away this summer after a courageous ten-year battle with colon cancer. During his last few months, he came to stay at our home in Greensboro; and as his condition weakened, we turned to Hospice for help. The care, compassion, assistance and reassurance they provided was immeasurable. The hospice team that helped us was only a phone call away, treating my brother with respect, unerringly meeting both his physical and emotional needs. And, they are still in contact with us to this day.

More than likely, we all have know someone whose life and those of the people around them have been turned upside down by cancer—whether friend, family, classmate, neighbor or colleague. It is a difficult journey that sometimes sadly ends with a focus on care rather than cure.  While Medicare and insurance can help pay for hospice services, some families can’t afford the costs, which vary depending upon need. Hospice often relies on donations to help them close the gap between family’s needs and their ability to pay.

My family was fortunate enough to have the resources at hand to supplement Hospice’s care for my brother during his final days. We would like to aid those who don’t have the resources to help their loved ones find this same quality of peace and comfort in their final days. We hope that you can keep us in mind as you plan for your 2012 donations.

Karen Buxton
Karen Buxton
Becky Sage
Becky Sage
Chip Harris
Chip Harris
Charles Fields
Charles Fields

2012 Team Members (click on a name to read their story)

Karen Buxton
Becky Sage
Dina Arceo
Phil Beane

Karen Buxton (2016)

Karen Buxton has been a professional coach for over 25 years and has specialized in working with endurance athletes for the past 15. Karen, who has a B.S. in Allied Health Sciences from Johnson State College and a M.Ed. in Athletic Administration from Temple University, holds coaching certifications of Level-III and Youth and Junior Level from USA Triathlon. She also has served as the Secretary-General of USA Triathlon's Board of Directors, Co-Chair for USAT’s Age Group Commission, a board member of USAT's Mid-Atlantic Region and a member of USAT’s Duathlon Commission.

Taking up triathlon 25 years ago, Karen has worked her way from a mid-packer in sprint-distance races to representing the United States on ten world teams (four in triathlon and six in duathlon). Highlights of her long racing career include: a member of a four-woman team that finished the 2002 Race Across America (RAAM), thirteen ironman-distance races including the 2005 & 2014 Hawaii Ironman World Championship, a 5th place overall finish in the 2000 U.S. Long Course Championships, 1st place age group finish at the 2007 Long Course Duathlon Championships, an age group silver medal at the 2007 Long Course World Duathlon Championships, and a second place finish in her age group a the 2010 USAT Sprint Triathlon National Championships. Buxton has been a four-time USA Triathlon All-American in 2001 (triathlon), 2003 (triathlon)  and 2014 (triathlon and duathlon), was a Silver All-World Ironman Athlete (2015), and has been inducted into her high school and college Athletic Halls of Fame.

Karen lives in Greensboro, NC, and coaches triathletes, duathletes, cyclists, swimmers and runners -- from beginners to elites.

Karen’s “Why Tri for Hospice” Story

In 2012 my brother Jeff, passed away after a courageous ten-year battle with colon cancer. During his last few months, he came to stay at our home in Greensboro, NC; and, as his condition weakened, we turned to Hospice for help. The care, compassion, assistance and reassurance they provided was immeasurable. The Hospice team that helped us was always only a phone call away, and they treated my brother with respect, unerringly meeting both his physical and emotional needs.

I soon discovered that I had a number of triathlon training partners who had also been touched by Hospice; and we decided to use our passion for the sport as an ongoing vehicle to support this vital community service. That first year we dedicated our efforts to the NYC Ironman, and we raised over $34,000 for our local Hospice.  In the subsequent years we have pushed that total to nearly $70,000, with a number of local community-building initiatives.


More than likely, we all have known someone whose life and the lives of the people around them have been turned upside down by a terminal illness—whether friend, family, classmate, neighbor or colleague. It is a difficult journey that often-times ends sadly with a focus on care rather than cure.  While Medicare and insurance can help pay for hospice services, some families can’t afford the costs, which vary depending upon need. Hospice often relies on donations to help them close the gap between a family’s needs and their ability to pay.

My family was fortunate enough to have the resources at hand to supplement Hospice’s care for my brother during his final days. I would like to aid those who don’t have the resources to help find this same quality of peace and comfort for their loved ones in their final days; and I invite you to contribute to this important cause.

So, in this new year, I hope that you will keep Tri for Hospice in mind as you plan your 2016 charitable donations.

 

Team Tri for Hospice - Caring to the Finish
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